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UCLA Graduate Division

Fulbright-Hays Award Winners Profiles

Caleb CarterCaleb Carter
UCLA Department: Asian Languages and Cultures
Year Entered Graduate School: 2007
Country of Study: Japan

Research

Caleb Carter's project examines the influence of ritual culture upon mountain pilgrimage in early modern Japan (seventeenth through mid-nineteenth century). During this time, people from all backgrounds increasingly traveled to mountain sites across the country. Through an investigation of extant pilgrimage materials from Mt. Togakushi (Nagano Prefecture), his research analyzes the dissemination of ritual once highly confidential to an expansive new base of visitors to the mountain. From these results, he will consider the implications for religious practice and the greater society during this time. Caleb is conducting this research at both Keio University (with Dr. Masataka Suzuki) in Tokyo and at the site of Mt. Togakushi.

Biography

Caleb Carter received his BA (2000) in Philosophy from Colorado College and his MA (2008) in Buddhist Studies from UCLA. His main area of study is Japanese religions, with a focus on ritual, identity, and historical formation. Other interests include Esoteric Buddhism, Chinese religions, sacred mountains, pilgrimage, material culture, and intellectual history. Caleb's dissertation investigates the development of the school of Shugendo in the case of Mt. Togakushi from the fifteenth through mid-nineteenth centuries. Translated roughly as "the way of testing oneself through practice," Shugendo refers to a body of ascetic practices, rituals and thought that coalesced around the mountains of Japan from the medieval period onward. Through an analysis of doctrinal works, temple records, pilgrimage materials and stone inscriptions, his dissertation traces the formation of Shugendo into a self-conscious school and its subsequent integration into early modern society.

After advancing to candidacy in July of 2011, Caleb spent his first year of dissertation research in Japan under the support of a Japan Foundation Fellowship. Outside of studies, he is usually hanging out with his family and occasionally gets out rock climbing. He keeps a casual blog on his research and other topics related to Japanese religions at asceticsandpilgrims.wordpress.com.

If stranded on a deserted island with only one type of meal to eat every day, what would you want it to be?

Belgian waffles, with maple syrup and enough toppings to mix it up each day.

If you did not pursue a graduate degree what would you have pursued?

Before pursuing an academic career, Caleb worked as a mountaineering instructor for Colorado Outward Bound. That would have been a fun path as well.


Daniel FrankenDaniel Franken
UCLA Department: History
Year Entered Graduate School: 2010
Country of Study: Brazil

Research

I use anthropometric evidence on human stature to track the biological standard of living in Brazil from 1860 through 1960.

Biography

After growing up in a small town in northern New Mexico, I attended an international school in Singapore from 2003-05. As odd as it may sound, and hugely a product of my Latin American friends at the school, it was there I perfected my Spanish language skills and deepened my interest in Latino culture. I then majored in International History at Georgetown University's Edmund A Walsh School of Foreign Service. It is a treat to continue my area studies at UCLA.

If stranded on a deserted island with only one type of meal to eat every day, what would you want it to be?

If I were stranded on a deserted island I would want tacos.

If you did not pursue a graduate degree what would you have pursued?

I would have pursued a career in translation and interpreting.


Lee MackeyLee Mackey
UCLA Department: Urban Planning, Luskin School of Public Affairs
Year Entered Graduate School: 2008
Countries of Study: Brazil, Bolivia, El Salvador

Research

This research analyzes the rise of Brazil as an emerging driver of regional development and environmental change in Latin America and across the tropical world. I construct more robust theory of the development interventions of 'emerging economies' in Latin America by moving beyond the dynamics of the Chinese case to draw insights from new Brazilian institutions of aid and trade in the region. I analyze the causes and outcomes of this process by examining Brazilian aid policies, technology transfer and agroindustrial development as part of regional case studies of the shift into ethanol exportation in Bolivia and El Salvador.

Biography

Lee holds a Master of Public Policy (MPP) from UCLA and a dual BA in History and Spanish from the University of Wisconsin. He also completed a Certificate in Global Health from the School of Public Health, trained with Latin American leaders at the Health Initiative of the Americas in Mexico, and undertook intensive Portuguese language study in Brazil. For three years, he held the position of Research Associate at the North American Integration and Development (NAID) Center where he advanced innovative transnational development initiatives based on extensive work in Mexico and Central America. The Fulbright Fellowship builds on a previous record of international awards that includes two Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships as well as the Land Deal Politics Initiative for research in Bolivia that he presented at the first international academic conference to examine transnational land deals, the International Conference on Global Land Grabbing at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) in England. Lee is fluent in Portuguese and Spanish and is a reviewer for multiple academic journals on development issues. Prior to graduate study he worked on Latin American migration in California, sustainable development in Nicaragua, microfinance in Bangladesh, and political conflict In Northern Ireland.

If stranded on a deserted island with only one type of meal to eat every day, what would you want it to be?

He would want it to be a Brazilian 'churrascaria' all-you-can-eat buffet. In other words, limitless decadent options.

If you did not pursue a graduate degree what would you have pursued?

He would have worked as an international development and environmental policy consultant, or opened a corner bistro restaurant, or just have married rich.


Rolf StraubhaarRolf Straubhaar
UCLA Department: Graduate School of Education and Information Studies
Year Entered Graduate School: 2010
Countries of Study: Brazil

Research

A rapidly growing literature in comparative education argues that the professional discourse in educational circles in the Global North has a strong influence in the Global South. However, little research as of yet has looked into what drives and maintains this influence, especially in non-profit settings. This study will fill this gap by exploring how locally-run educational non-profits in Rio de Janeiro adapt education reform models culturally indigenous to the Global North (like that created by Teach For America) into their programming.

Biography

Rolf Straubhaar is getting his Ph.D. in comparative education, with a disciplinary focus in the anthropology of education. His research focuses on the global flow of peoples and cultural influences between educational systems, involving two major research projects focused on the experiences of recently arrived immigrant students in U.S. schools and the transfer of U.S. notions and models of educational reform to the Global South. Prior to entering this program, Mr. Straubhaar taught in adult literacy settings for several years (in the U.S., Brazil and Mozambique), and through that experience first developed his strong continuing interest in the theory and pedagogical methods of Paulo Freire. He is also an alumnus of Teach For America, and taught in elementary school settings for several years in various parts of the U.S. (namely, in New York City and on the Navajo Reservation in northwestern New Mexico).

If stranded on a deserted island with only one type of meal to eat every day, what would you want it to be?

A plate of rice and beans and a steak, Brazilian-style. Though that would seem like a rather atypical and well-stocked deserted island.

If you did not pursue a graduate degree what would you have pursued?

I would continue to work as an educator. Most likely I would stay in adult education in Brazil or Mozambique, like in my early career.